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International Relations Security Defense Nuclear CSS Blog

Europe’s Nuclear Landscape

This week’s featured graphic maps Europe’s nuclear landscape. To find out more on Europe and the nuclear ban treaty, read Névine Schepers’ CSS Analyses in Security Policy here.

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International Relations Finance CSS Blog

Geographic Distribution of AIIB and NDB lending (Approved Loans)

This week’s featured graphic maps the geographic distribution of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and New Development Bank lending (approved loans) as of October 2020. For more on China, Multilateral Banking and Geopolitics, read Chris Humphrey and Linda Maduz’s CSS Analysis in Security Policy here.

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Conflict Peace CSS Blog

Distribution of Ceasefires and Follow-​up Arrangements

This week’s featured graphic shows the distribution of ceasefires and follow-up arrangements across Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East between 1989 and 2018. For more on the role of ceasefires in intra-state peace processes, read Govinda Clayton, Simon J. A. Mason, Valerie Sticher and Claudia Wiehler’s CSS Analyses in Security Policy here.

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Economy Trade CSS Blog

The Belt and Road Initiative in Europe

This week’s featured graphic maps the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) in Europe as of December 2019. To find out more, click here to read this Strategic Trends 2020 chapter by Henrik Larsen and Linda Maduz on how China’s growing influence in Europe has the potential to create new geoeconomic divides.

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Diplomacy Politics CSS Blog

The Biden Administration’s Impulse to US-EU Cooperation on Libya

Image courtesy of Tech. Sgt. Brigitte Brantley/DVIDS.

The US has maintained a relatively passive approach to Libya under President Donald Trump, whose administration largely left the Libyan dossier to Egypt, several Arab Gulf states, Turkey, Europeans, and Russia. In 2021, however, America’s new leadership will probably try to assert US influence in the war-torn country more actively.[i] President-elect Joe Biden and those in his inner circle have vowed to push back against Moscow in various ways, which means Libya could be a growing point of contention between the incoming US administration and Russia. In any event, the Libyan crisis offers Biden an opportunity to demonstrate to Washington’s traditional Western allies that his administration is determined to reassert US leadership in the world and stand against President Vladimir Putin’s designs for Libya and, by extension, in the Middle East and Africa too. It is unclear, however, whether Biden’s plans for countering Moscow’s hand in Libya will be more rhetorical or strategic, and how far his administration would be ready to escalate US-Russia tensions in relation to Libya.