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Strategic Trends 2021: New Power Configurations and Regional Security

Strategic Trends 2021 offers a concise analysis of major developments in world affairs, with a focus on international security. It features chapters on China-​Russia relations and transatlantic security, Franco-​German-British security cooperation after Brexit, Turkey’s power projection in the Middle East and beyond, Europe and major-​power shifts in the Middle East, and Japanese and South Korean perspectives on changing power configurations in Asia.

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Foreign policy

The Militarization of US Foreign Policy: Engagement with Europe Increasingly about Defense

Image courtesy of Jason Robertson/DVIDS

This article was originally published by the Finnish Institute of International Affairs (FIIA) in November 2019.

 The US Department of Defense is playing a predominant role in US foreign policy due to expanded mandates, large budgets and the disparagement of diplomacy by the Trump Administration. Defense relations may be the steadier foundation for transatlantic cooperation.

Categories
Intelligence

Transatlantic Intelligence Ties Remain Strong: Insulated against Political Turmoil

Image courtesy of The White House/Flickr.

This article was originally published by the Finnish Institute of International Affairs (FIIA) on 13 August 2019.

Headlines are rife with stories about political turmoil in transatlantic relations, and bitter disputes over trade and defence spending. Yet for the US Intelligence Community, ties with transatlantic partners have remained insulated against political differences. History shows that intelligence relationships follow their own logic.

Categories
International Relations

Managing Global Disorder: Prospects for Transatlantic Cooperation

Image courtesy of Shealah Craighead/The While House/Flickr

This article was originally published by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) on 20 August 2018.

In July 2018, the Council on Foreign Relations’ Center for Preventive Action convened a workshop to examine areas of cooperation between the United States and the European Union. The workshop was made possible by the generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The views described here are those of the workshop participants only and are not CFR or Carnegie Corporation positions. The Council on Foreign Relations takes no institutional positions on policy issues and has no affiliation with the U.S. government.

Introduction

Categories
International Relations Security

If the Transatlantic Relationship Sneezes, Will NATO Catch a Cold?

Image courtesy of NATO/Flickr. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

This article was originally published by War on the Rocks on 21 May 2018.

On May 17, when NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg met with President Donald Trump at the White House, part of Stoltenberg’s agenda was to insulate NATO from the political winds whipping through the transatlantic relationship. It’s too early to tell if he succeeded, but it is now entirely possible that when the United States and its allies meet at the NATO Summit in Brussels in July, transatlantic relations will be at their lowest ebb since the 2003 Iraq War. Will the NATO alliance, buffeted by disputes not directly related to its mission, feel the chill of this deep freeze in transatlantic political relations, or be insulated from it?