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Technology Defense Cyber CSS Blog

Initiators and Defenders in Major Cyber Theft Incidents, 2000 – 2018

This week’s featured graphic maps the nations in which major cyber theft incidents were initiated and countries affected by these attacks between 2000 and 2018. To find out what this highlights about the eclipse of Western military-technological superiority, read Michael Hass’ chapter for Strategic Trends 2019 here.

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Technology Defense Cyber Coronavirus CSS Blog

Initiators and Defenders in Major Cyber Theft Incidents (2000-2018)

This graphic provides an overview of the nations in which major cyber theft incidents were initiated, as well as the countries affected by these attacks between 2000 and 2018. To find out what this highlights about the eclipse of Western military-technological superiority, read Michael Haas’ chapter for Strategic Trends 2019 here. Strategic Trends 2020 is out on 30 April.

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Cyber CSS Blog

Contested Public Attributions of Cyber Incidents and the Role of Academia

Image courtesy of Saksham Gangwar/Unsplash

In a recent article in Contemporary Security Policy, Florian J. Egloff reflects on the contested nature of public attributions of cyber incidents and what role academia could take up.

In the last five years, public attribution of cyber incidents has gone from an incredibly rare event to a regular occurrence. Just in October 2018, the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre publicized its assessment of cyber activities conducted by the Russian military intelligence service (also known by its old acronym, the GRU). Clearly, publicizing activities that other political actors like to keep secret is a political act – but what kind of political act is it and what happens when a government publicly attributes?

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Technology Defense CSS Blog

Initiators and Defenders in Major Cyber Theft Incidents, 2000 – 2018

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This graphic provides an overview of the nations in which major cyber theft incidents were initiated as well as the countries affected by these attacks between 2000 and 2018. To find out what this highlights about the eclipse of Western military-technological superiority, read Michael Hass’ chapter for Strategic Trends 2019 here.

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Security

Why Cyberattacks Don’t Work as Weapons

Image courtesy of Pexels/Pixabay

This article was originally published by ETH Zurich in the Zukunftsblog on 18 January 2018.

Cyberattacks must also be understood as a phenomenon of political violence and combated as such, says Myriam Dunn Cavelty.

Digitalisation will fundamentally alter many aspects of our lives – in many cases for the better. However, our increasing dependence on computers and networks for data exchange and storage is creating new vulnerabilities for both individuals and society. The key word here is: cybersecurity. This encompasses more than just technical solutions: it involves not only security in cyberspace, but also security that is influenced by cyberspace.