The CSS Blog Network

Fishing Wars: Competition for South China Sea’s Fishery Resources

Chinese fishing boat

Chinese fishing boat. Photo: Ian Lloyd/flickr.

The hydrocarbon potential of the South China Sea (SCS) has become a source of tension between the littoral states of the region and, to a certain extent, a number of outside actors. However, the SCS’s significance to global oil and gas supplies is over-hyped. Instead, it is the region’s fisheries rather than fossil fuels that have the potential to ignite a regional conflict.

Fish not fuel

Put simply, speculation that the SCS constitutes a ‘second Persian Gulf’ lacks substance. According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), the region’s offshore energy resources – at just over 11 billion barrels of oil and 190 trillion cubic feet of natural gas – are comparable to European supplies. Contrary to popular belief, most of SCS’s oil and gas resources are actually located in non-disputed territory, closer to the shores of coastal states. Factors such as technological challenges, inadequate seismic studies, plus huge costs and political risks also place serious limits on deep-water drilling farther into the SCS. » More

ISN Quiz: Surviving the Coming Scarcity

Test your knowledge about scarcity, the topic of our latest Special Report.

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Militant Munchies

Because insurgency is hard work / Photo: Mike Chaput-Branson/flickr

Forget MREs. Terrorists in the Caucasus reportedly keep their tummies full during the winter by downing Snickers bars.

Acccording to a post on RFE/RL’s Transmissions blog, Wahhabbi militants snowed under in the Chechen region get their nutrition from that peanut, caramel and chocolate concoction that has kept American schoolkids bouncing off of rec room walls for decades.

[…]A few tens of militants may hide in Chechen gorges. Now when mountain passes are covered with snow and delivery of food from abroad is impossible, bandits eat snickers bars.

(Are Snickers halal? This person says yes. This site says no. This site says…well I’m not sure.)

But there’s a down side to succumbing to the scent of Snickers. According to the post, folks seen purchasing five bars or more are under “special control” by authorities.

Whether that’s security control or weight control, I’m not sure.